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Weightlifting Training Videos

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LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 5 - SNATCH PULL (LOW BLOCKS). Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. Performing lifts from the low blocks is the most challenging posture for a beginner. There is no first pull from the floor, but the lifter starts with the barbell just below the knees, with the knees nearly straight. The shoulders are well in front of the feet. Balance is slightly toward the heels, but not so far back that the toes rise. This position results in an extreme stretch of the hamstrings. The lift starts by moving the shoulders vertically upward. The hamstrings extend the hip and also flex the knees. Now the lifter is in the same “power” position previously used with the high block lifts. Moving from a position with the knees nearly straight to the power position with ankles and knees flexed is called the transition phase. From this power position the lifter executes an explosive second pull. Beginners should not attempt to lift from the low blocks until they have solidly mastered the power snatch from the high block position. When beginning from the low position a lifter might temporarily use a 1-2 count to first get back into the power position (1), then continue from the power position (2) to execute a snatch high pull as previously done from the higher starting position. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

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LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 4 - POWER SNATCH, HIGH HANG (NO BLOCKS). Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. After learning the explosive, balanced snatch pull from the high hangs it is time to move to the full power snatch from the same position. It is best for new lifters to learn the power snatch first, then move later to a squat or split style snatch. Start by grasping with a wide hook grip an empty bar. Take a starting position with the feet about shoulder width apart. Bend the ankles and knees, keeping the center of pressure on the feet toward, but not on, the toes. Seen from the side, the knees are forward of the toes. Grasp the dowel, PVC, or empty bar with a wide hook grip, elbows facing outward. As in the snatch pull, the bar contacts the lifter at the hip crease. Shoulders are over, or slightly in front of, the bar. Initially using the lower body muscles only, the lifter pushes the barbell upward, quickly triple extending the lower body, and then immediately pulls him/herself down against the rising empty bar (an easier concept to experience once weight is added). The wrists remain flexed with the barbell very close to the torso during the pull-under. As the barbell passes the lifter’s face the wrists are quickly extended to flip the bar overhead while lowering into a partial squat receiving position. It is suggested that new lifters initially practice this sequence with no added foot movement. Foot movement, usually needed to achieve a deep squat position, may be added later. The bar arrives overhead with elbows locked, wrists extended (palm up), located over the lifter’s shoulders. The lifter recovers to a steady standing position, takes a breath, lowers the bar by “reverse pressing” the bar close to the face, and returns the bar to the starting position to repeat for the desired number of repetitions. Beginners are advised to master this movement during initial sessions before moving on. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

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LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 4 - POWER SNATCH (HIGH BLOCKS) Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. After learning the explosive, balanced snatch pull from high blocks it is time to move to the full power snatch from the same position. It is best for new lifters to learn the power snatch first, then move later to a squat or split style snatch. Take a starting position with the feet about shoulder width apart. Bend the ankles and knees, keeping the center of pressure on the feet toward, but not on, the toes. Seen from the side, the knees are forward of the toes. Grasp the barbell (elevated on blocks) with a wide hook grip, elbows facing outward. As in the snatch pull, the block height is such that the bar contacts the lifter at the hip crease. Shoulders are over, or slightly in front of, the bar. Initially using the lower body muscles only, the lifter pushes the barbell upward, quickly triple extending the lower body, and then immediately pulls him/herself down against the rising barbell. The wrists remain flexed with the barbell very close to the torso during the pull-under. As the barbell passes the lifter’s face the wrists are quickly extended to flip the bar overhead while lowering into a partial squat receiving position. It is suggested that new lifters initially practice this sequence with no added foot movement. Foot movement, usually needed to achieve a deep squat position, may be added later. The bar arrives overhead with elbows locked, wrists extended (palm up), located over the lifter’s shoulders. The lifter recovers to a steady standing position, takes a breath, lowers the bar by “reverse pressing” the bar close to the face, and returns the bar to the blocks to repeat for the desired number of repetitions. Beginners are advised to master this movement during initial sessions before moving on. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

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HOW TO CLEAN AND JERK. The clean and jerk is the second lift performed in competitive weightlifting. It is a total body, multiple joint lift allowing the most weight to be lifted from the ground to overhead. Properly executed, portions of the clean and of the jerk produce 2,500 – 4,500 watts of power. A couple of years ago a national survey reported that more than 90% of high school strength coaches consider the clean one of the two most important exercises (the other being the squat) for athletes. The term "clean" comes from an original technical rule that required the barbell to be lifted from the ground to the shoulders without any bar contact on the body. That rule changed in the 1960s, so we now see contact of the bar against the thighs, resulting in greater power and improved records. For instructional purposes we separate the lift into two learning segments. A lifter may employ one of three clean styles (squat, split, power) during the clean. We will cover only the split jerk style, although the power jerk will be used in the learning process for the jerk. The C&J is tiring, so high repetitions are inappropriate. Elite lifters normally training no more than 3 repetitions. Lifters can mix it up, doing all cleans, then all jerks or maybe a clean & jerk, clean & jerk, clean & jerk or clean, 3 jerks, and finish with the final two cleans. Variety in the workout makes sense, and this also allows the lifter to prioritize that part of the lift on which the most emphasis needs to occur. With proper technique the clean is safe and effective. Of course, poor technique or using too much weight may lead to injury. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.