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PUTTING STROKE MECHANICS. Good putting stroke mechanics begin with understanding what body parts are involved.  Learn the essentials for consistency with two simple exercises.  Eliminate lower ...Read more

TODAY'S TIPS

To Win At Doubles, Learn To Hit The 3 T's.

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TO WIN AT DOUBLES, LEARN TO HIT THE 3 T'S. Winning consistently at doubles requires an aggressive approach. You and your partner need to know where to hit the ball in different situations to set each other up for the kill. In this video, former WTA top 50 player, Jane Forman, shows you how to develop an aggressive winning plan by aiming for the 3 T's. Her saying "Low, You Go. High, You Die" is brought into vivid clarity in a great drill designed to sharpen your aggressive instincts on the court (and maybe your defensive reflexes and ducking skills, too!). Check it out and watch your double results improve immediately.

Learn To Snatch - Lesson 5 - Snatch Pull (Low Blocks)

LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 5 - SNATCH PULL (LOW BLOCKS). Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. Performing lifts from the low blocks is the most challenging posture for a beginner. There is no first pull from the floor, but the lifter starts with the barbell just below the knees, with the knees nearly straight. The shoulders are well in front of the feet. Balance is slightly toward the heels, but not so far back that the toes rise. This position results in an extreme stretch of the hamstrings. The lift starts by moving the shoulders vertically upward. The hamstrings extend the hip and also flex the knees. Now the lifter is in the same “power” position previously used with the high block lifts. Moving from a position with the knees nearly straight to the power position with ankles and knees flexed is called the transition phase. From this power position the lifter executes an explosive second pull. Beginners should not attempt to lift from the low blocks until they have solidly mastered the power snatch from the high block position. When beginning from the low position a lifter might temporarily use a 1-2 count to first get back into the power position (1), then continue from the power position (2) to execute a snatch high pull as previously done from the higher starting position. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

1st Move For Great Serves - Delay The Serving Hand

1ST MOVE FOR GREAT SERVES - DELAY THE SERVING HAND. Former ATP top 100 pro Jeff Salzenstein will teach you the keys to improving your serve. In this video, "The Serve Surgeon" dispels one of the biggest serving myths: Down Together, Up Together. This serving mantra has been used by tennis teachers for decades, but Salzenstein demonstrates why great servers actually delay the serving hand when they serve, focusing first on the toss and then following with the serving hand. Learn the most effective positions for the hands and elbow in this informative lesson by one the world's best teachers.

Learn to Clean - Step 2 - Clean from High Hang (No Blocks)

LEARN TO CLEAN - STEP 2 - CLEAN FROM HIGH HANG (NO BLOCKS). Learn the Clean and Jerk lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. After learning the explosive, balanced clean pull from the high hang position it is time to move to the full clean from the same position. Get into the same starting position with the feet about shoulder width apart. Bend the ankles and knees, keeping the center of pressure on the feet toward, but not on, the toes. Seen from the side, the knees are forward of the toes. Grasp the barbell with a hook grip, placing the hands slightly wider than the shoulders, elbows facing outward. As in the clean pull, the bar contacts the lifter’s mid-thigh. Shoulders are over, or slightly in front of, the bar. Using the lower body muscles only, the lifter pushes the barbell upward, quickly triple extending the lower body, then immediately pulling him/herself down against the rising barbell. The barbell remains very close to the torso during the pull-under, using the bar’s revolving mechanism, along with a rapid relocation of the elbows forward, under the bar, to rack the weight on the shoulders and clavicles. When racked the shoulders and clavicles are raised slightly to keep the barbell from restricting breathing. Once the barbell is racked, the lifter continues into a deep squat (squat style clean) or stops in a ½ squat position (power clean). A lifter performing a split clean begins to split at the end of the second pull and during the pull-under phase, racking the bar about the time the feet land. (The weights used for learning technique are light, so lifters may rack the weight high, but then practice moving into the ultimate low squat or low split position that will eventually be used to lift heavier loads.) The lifter recovers to a steady standing position, takes a breath, and returns the bar to the starting position to repeat for the desired number of repetitions. Beginners are advised to master this movement during initial sessions before moving on.

Learn To Clean - Step 3 - Clean Pull, Low Hang (No Blocks)

LEARN TO CLEAN - STEP 3 - CLEAN PULL FROM LOW HANG (NO BLOCKS). Learn the Clean and Jerk lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. Performing lifts from the low hang position is the most challenging posture for a beginner. There is no first pull from the floor, but the lifter starts with the barbell just below the knees, with the knees nearly straight. The shoulders are well in front of the feet. Balance is slightly toward the heels, but not so far back that the toes rise. This position results in an extreme stretch of the hamstrings. The lift starts by moving the shoulders vertically upward. The hamstrings extend the hip and also flex the knees. Now the lifter is in the same “power” position previously used with the high hang lifts. Moving from a position with the knees nearly straight to the power position with ankles and knees flexed is called the transition phase. From this power position the lifter executes an explosive second pull. Beginners should not attempt to lift from the low hang position until they have solidly mastered the clean from the high hang position. When beginning from the low position a lifter might temporarily use a 1-2 count to first get back into the power position (1), then continue from the power position (2) to execute a clean pull as previously done from the higher starting position.

Primary Training For Esports: Improve Lower Body Strength and Mobility

PRIMARY TRAINING FOR ESPORTS: IMPROVE LOWER BODY STRENGTH AND MOBILITY. Watch esports performance trainer, Taylor Johnson, guide professional gamers Mike "Hypoc" Robins and Ian "BaHaWaKa" Crowe through some lower body strength and mobility exercises. These professional gamers use Assisted Squats and Quadraped Hip Circles to help prepare their lower body muscles for hours-long grueling competitions. Add these exercises to your training routine and improve your gaming performance level.


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