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LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 4 - POWER SNATCH, HIGH HANG (NO BLOCKS). Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. After learning the explosive, balanced snatch pull from the high hangs it is time to move to the full power snatch from the same position. It is best for new lifters to learn the power snatch first, then move later to a squat or split style snatch. Start by grasping with a wide hook grip an empty bar. Take a starting position with the feet about shoulder width apart. Bend the ankles and knees, keeping the center of pressure on the feet toward, but not on, the toes. Seen from the side, the knees are forward of the toes. Grasp the dowel, PVC, or empty bar with a wide hook grip, elbows facing outward. As in the snatch pull, the bar contacts the lifter at the hip crease. Shoulders are over, or slightly in front of, the bar. Initially using the lower body muscles only, the lifter pushes the barbell upward, quickly triple extending the lower body, and then immediately pulls him/herself down against the rising empty bar (an easier concept to experience once weight is added). The wrists remain flexed with the barbell very close to the torso during the pull-under. As the barbell passes the lifter’s face the wrists are quickly extended to flip the bar overhead while lowering into a partial squat receiving position. It is suggested that new lifters initially practice this sequence with no added foot movement. Foot movement, usually needed to achieve a deep squat position, may be added later. The bar arrives overhead with elbows locked, wrists extended (palm up), located over the lifter’s shoulders. The lifter recovers to a steady standing position, takes a breath, lowers the bar by “reverse pressing” the bar close to the face, and returns the bar to the starting position to repeat for the desired number of repetitions. Beginners are advised to master this movement during initial sessions before moving on. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

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Learn To Snatch - Lesson 5 - Snatch Pull (Low Blocks)

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LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 5 - SNATCH PULL (LOW BLOCKS). Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. Performing lifts from the low blocks is the most challenging posture for a beginner. There is no first pull from the floor, but the lifter starts with the barbell just below the knees, with the knees nearly straight. The shoulders are well in front of the feet. Balance is slightly toward the heels, but not so far back that the toes rise. This position results in an extreme stretch of the hamstrings. The lift starts by moving the shoulders vertically upward. The hamstrings extend the hip and also flex the knees. Now the lifter is in the same “power” position previously used with the high block lifts. Moving from a position with the knees nearly straight to the power position with ankles and knees flexed is called the transition phase. From this power position the lifter executes an explosive second pull. Beginners should not attempt to lift from the low blocks until they have solidly mastered the power snatch from the high block position. When beginning from the low position a lifter might temporarily use a 1-2 count to first get back into the power position (1), then continue from the power position (2) to execute a snatch high pull as previously done from the higher starting position. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

Chipping & Pitching: Hands Position

CHIPPING & PITCHING: HANDS POSITION Learn how to set your hands on short shots by identifying the natural “hang” of the left arm (right arm for lefties). Setting your hands in the right position for chips and pitches will insure correct impact position at contact, and give you more effective shots around the green to lower your scores.

Basic Movement For The “O” Attack With Gene Mayer

BASIC MOVEMENT FOR THE "O" ATTACK WITH GENE MAYER. Let grand-slam winner, and former world #4 player, Gene Mayer, show you the importance of using “The O Attack”, the basic footwork movements used by all top tour professionals for effective, consistent groundstrokes. “The O Attack” helps create optimal rotational power for players of all levels. Learn the most effective way to load on the outside leg, the importance of placing your outside “load” foot at a 45º angle, and the role of the leverage leg in shot preparation. “The O Attack” allows players to establish a comfortable hip position for powerful rotation at contact. It also let’s players create reliable shape and direction on their shots, based on repeatable movements, instead of just pure talent.

Learn To Snatch - Lesson 5 - Snatch Pull (Low Blocks)

LEARN TO SNATCH - LESSON 5 - SNATCH PULL (LOW BLOCKS). Learn the Snatch lift from U.S. Olympic & Team USA coach, Harvey Newton. Performing lifts from the low blocks is the most challenging posture for a beginner. There is no first pull from the floor, but the lifter starts with the barbell just below the knees, with the knees nearly straight. The shoulders are well in front of the feet. Balance is slightly toward the heels, but not so far back that the toes rise. This position results in an extreme stretch of the hamstrings. The lift starts by moving the shoulders vertically upward. The hamstrings extend the hip and also flex the knees. Now the lifter is in the same “power” position previously used with the high block lifts. Moving from a position with the knees nearly straight to the power position with ankles and knees flexed is called the transition phase. From this power position the lifter executes an explosive second pull. Beginners should not attempt to lift from the low blocks until they have solidly mastered the power snatch from the high block position. When beginning from the low position a lifter might temporarily use a 1-2 count to first get back into the power position (1), then continue from the power position (2) to execute a snatch high pull as previously done from the higher starting position. A great video for competitive weightlifters, Crossfit participants and strength coaches.

Putting Aim

PUTTING AIM. Aiming your putts can be a challenge because of the natural inclination to set the stance and body at the target, rather that parallel to the target line.  Learn how to perfectly "square up" and begin making more putts.

Chipping & Pitching: Distance Control Drill

CHIPPING & PITCHING: DISTANCE CONTROL DRILL. Learn this great exercise to make your practice sessions fun while quickly mastering the relationship between stroke length and distance.  Develop precision around the greens with the "ladder" drill. Learn to chip and pitch like a pro!